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What Is Noryl?

23 Aug

source: http://www.polymerplastics.com/mechanical_noryl.shtml

Noryl

Noryl is a modified Polyphenylene Oxide developed by GE Plastics in 1966. Noryl EN265 is stocked and sold by Polymer Plastics. This grade offers the flame retardance advantage over other grades of Noryl and has a UL94 V-1 rating with a continuous use temperature of 105 degrees.

Noryl has good high and low temperature performance with a range from -40 degrees F to 265 degrees F. Because of its stability under load, high impact and mechanical strength, low water absorption, excellent electrical properties, and food flammability ratings, Noryl set itself apart from other materials.

It is available in a wide range of sizes in rod, sheet, and custom profiles. Modified Noryl is available in both unfilled and glass filled formulations.

Outstanding ease of fabrication in machining, thermoforming, bonding, or ultrasonic sealing, makes it a favorite of plastic fabricators. However, because Noryl is attacked by petroleum products, coolants and cutting oils containing petroleum should not be used. Because of this limitation, Noryl should not be specified for parts which may come in contact with petroleum products during normal use.

Properties

Thermal stability

Low thermal conductivity

Low coefficient of thermal expansion

UL 94 V-1 rated for .060″ thickness

High impact strength

High tensile strength and flexural modulus

Resists creep and deformation under load

Low water absorption

Excellent electrical properties

Easily formed

Applications

Water softener valves Vaporizer parts
Water pump components Surgical instruments
Coil forms and bobbins Appliance housings
Mass transit seat housings Relay cases
Motor controls and wiring devices Beverage dispenser components


(Images not part of original article)

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8 Comments

Posted by on August 23, 2007 in General Knowledge, Mechanical Plastics

 

8 responses to “What Is Noryl?

  1. romano verardi

    September 14, 2009 at 6:43 am

    We need to know the chemical characteristic resistant as alcole ethilic, methilic, chlorine, lactic acid , and so on.
    Many Thanks
    romano verardi
    quality manager

     
  2. Zahid Akhter

    November 13, 2009 at 11:47 am

    What is noryl and what is composition.
    Thanks

     
  3. kishan patel

    July 22, 2010 at 1:48 am

    wot’s the dosage of HIPS, ABS & other material into Noryl for the submercibal pipe application.

     
  4. Yusuf Karim

    July 26, 2010 at 4:30 am

    I urgently require a sample of the “NORYL injection moulding compound”. Grade unknown, must not cause any sinking on the moulded item and blemishes at the injection points.
    Application is: To manufacture a sliding window frame in the automotive industry. Shrinkage 0,7% and must be UV resistant.

     
  5. Vincent David

    January 11, 2011 at 4:01 am

    Where can i get this material in Malaysia, any distributor?

     
  6. Lester Cramer

    January 18, 2011 at 10:33 pm

    Hi; Was interested in this because i was reading about making hydrogen you said you were using this for electrodes and it didn’t get used up so fast as metal electrodes .in electrolisis’I’m hoping you solve the problem of making hydrogen to run cars on hydrogen.Hydrogen on demand and the electrodes last for a long time .I can understand the metal ones being used up too quick.I’m 95 yrs old and hope you get the hydrogen problem solved so i can run my car on water .Be fore i,m 100.Been a mechanic all my life I still drive my red Intrepid dodge.Keep trying .Les Cramer

     
  7. Joseph Vuillemin

    May 30, 2011 at 5:11 pm

    Can you recommend a good adhesive for bonding NORYL to NORYL and NORYL to steel

     
  8. John Perlman

    January 9, 2012 at 2:25 pm

    Noryl will crack in less than 24 hours when exposed to any oil, vegetable or mineral.

     

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